Season in Review: Cornell Big Red

Chris Wroblewski helped guide the Big Red through a rebuilding year that finished on a sweet note for the team's departing seniors and brought optimism to fans in Ithaca. (Photo Credit: cornellbigred.com)

This is the sixth piece in a series looking back at how each Ivy League squad fared during the 2010-11 season. The Cornell Big Red ended the year at 10-18 (6-8), finishing in a tie for fifth place.

A traffic jam slowed the Red team bus’ progress to a halt en route to game one of the 2010-2011 season. Stop. Roll a few feet forward. Pause again. Accelerate. Miss the street. U-turn. Accelerate one more time. Finally reach the destination.As the bus crawled toward the University of

Albany arena it felt as if the world wasn’t quite ready to let go of Cinderella from the previous year. Eight seniors had departed from the team that reached the Sweet Sixteen for the first time in school history.  An entirely new coaching staff was in place. The lone holdover from the starting lineup was a junior guard who was too banged up from the preseason to play on opening night. What had been a well-oiled machine several months prior was missing several parts and seemed due for a factory recall.

Outside of a win that evening and another in the home opener against Delaware the following week, the first half of the season seemed bleak for the Red.  After a 24-point drubbing at the hands of Seton Hall, first-year head coach Bill Courtney likened his squad without top-returner Chris Wroblewski to “Linus without his blankey.” Cornell was missing more than just a leader early in the campaign though.

The non-conference slate was chock-full of teases. A two-point loss at home to St. Bonaventure was followed by close defeats at Lehigh and Boston University. Despite falling by 20 at the Carrier Dome, the Red played upstate-New York rival Syracuse even in the second half. An upset bid fell just short against the then-thirteenth ranked Golden Gophers in Minnesota. By late December, eight consecutive losses had piled up and the Red had dropped six games by five points or fewer.

As Ivy play approached, Cornell seemed to turn a corner.  A pair of wins bracketed a loss to Buffalo and sophomore forward Errick Peck began to evolve into the player that the Red faithful had expected to see several months prior. Hope was temporarily restored that rebuilding was merely a non-conference process.

It quickly became clear that the Red was still a work in progress though. Just two weeks removed from the longest Cornell skid in over a decade, the group from East Hill embarked on another troubled journey. It’s difficult to determine  exactly when Cornell hit rock bottom. The Red was swept by travel-partner Columbia for the first time since 2002, fell into a 28-point first half hole at Ancient Eight bottom-feeder Dartmouth, got trounced in Cambridge despite playing solid basketball and gave up a 10-point lead in the final 1:58 at Yale. After five league games, the Red was still winless in conference play and had sunk Now eGamingReview reviews that Holland has released a request plans (RFP) to have an gambling online partner. to dead last in the Ivy standings.

The low point may be uncertain, but the turning point is much more clear. At season’s close, Coach Courtney singled out the loss at Yale as the game that began to shift the momentum for Cornell. After shuffling through eight different starting lineups, the staff finally settled on a group for the opening tip. Surprisingly, Cornell’s top five was not its most effective starting five. Freshman Jake Matthews joined sophomores Josh Figini and Miles Asafo-Adjei in the rotation while Peck and Wroblewski cemented starting roles for stability’s sake.

Cornell finally broke the Ancient Eight ice in Providence, putting six players in double figures to top Brown in decisive fashion. From that point on the rotation was set. The first three to five minutes of each half were dedicated to the energy guys before the veterans would find their way onto the court. Mark Coury and Adam Wire subbed in the frontcourt while Drew Ferry and Max Groebe found minutes in the backcourt. Former manager Johnny Gray contributed at any position one through four, while some combination of Anthony There are two characteristics of a virgo horoscope to be taken under control: possessiveness and unwillingness to change his life. Gatlin, Eitan Chemerinski, Manny Sahota and Peter McMillan would plug in the final few minutes.

Overall, the stats from the first half and the second half of the year did not look drastically different. Yes, points in the paint increased, rebounding improved and front court play in general solidified as the year progressed, but beyond numbers it was a sense of cohesion that seemed to form as the season wore on.  The Sweet Sixteen team of a year before was branded nationally as a group of best friends whose camaraderie off the court became chemistry on the court.  Eventually that same joint swagger began to show for the new look Red.

The 14-man rotation, which may have been even larger save several injuries and ailments, reeled off consecutive wins for the first time all year, beating Penn in overtime at home the following weekend. The next night Cornell was just a buzzer-beater short of knocking off league-champion Princeton. It became clear that something was brewing in Ithaca.

In the coming weeks Mark Coury became an offensive force for the first time in his long career, tying his personal best with 13 points on back-to-back nights at Princeton and Penn. Outside of Coury, contributions came from different players each night. Not knowing where points would come from went from a problem early in the campaign to a solution late in the year. With a different group showing up as the supporting cast each night, the Red was able to rely on the entire roster by season’s close.

Losses to co-champs Harvard and Princeton were the only two L’s remaining on Cornell’s schedule. The Red finished strong, winning six of its last nine and four of its last five, including three straight to end the year on the group’s longest win streak of the season.

On Senior Night versus Yale, the turnaround was completed. Against arguably the top frontcourt player in the Ancient Eight, Greg Mangano, the Red forwards performed well, once again establishing a 10-point lead with 1:58 remaining against the Elis. This time there was no falter. Instead of crumbling down the stretch as they had done four weeks prior, Cornell extended the lead and sent seniors Aaron Osgood, Mark Coury and Adam Wire out with a victory.

Stop. Roll a few feet forward. Pause again. Accelerate. Miss the street. U-turn. Accelerate one more time. Finally reach the destination.

The 2010-2011 campaign was far from smooth for the Red, but the progress in year one under head coach Bill Courtney was clear. After significant rebuilding, a destination – albeit an unfamiliar one – was reached. Three consecutive NCAA Tournament berths makes 10-18 (6-8 Ivy) feel like a disappointment, but in a year of complete upheaval for the program, the Red met all reasonable expectations and provided hope for the future.

Short-lived spring rumors hinted that Bill Courtney would jump at an offer from Final Four participant George Mason, but with the new headman staying put and only three graduating seniors departing, Cornell seems primed for a year on the rise.

Season in Review: Harvard Crimson

Fans celebrated at Lavietes Pavilion when Harvard knocked off Princeton, 79-67, on March 5th, 2011 to capture their first share of an Ivy League crown. (Photo Credit: gocrimson.com)
This is the fourth piece in a series looking back at how each Ivy League squad fared during the 2010-11 season. The Harvard Crimson ended the year at 23-7 (12-2), finishing in a tie for first place and earning an NIT bid.

 

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. 2010-11 was Harvard basketball’s most successful season to date and its most heartbreaking. The Crimson won 23 games and earned its first-ever share of an Ivy League title, but, thanks to a Doug Davis leaner, it failed to punch a ticket to the Dance, and, like every other year since the Truman administration, it was on the outside looking in on the Madness.

Still, the final result—an NIT bid—was not an insignificant achievement for a team that began the season with serious question marks. The departure of jack-of-all-trades guard Jeremy Lin left an enormous void across the board in Harvard’s production. Lacking a star of Lin’s stature, the team would need to rely on all of its players to collectively compensate for the loss of the Golden State guard. But before the season even began, that task grew more difficult when reigning Ivy League Rookie of the Year Kyle Casey suffered a broken bone in his foot, sidelining the big man for eight weeks and hampering him throughout the season.

Harvard began its schedule with a lackluster road performance against a very strong George Mason team, which ran away from the Crimson in the second half en route to a 66-53 victory. Two weeks later, Harvard labored throughout a three-point win over a lowly Bryant squad that went 1-29 the year before. But the Crimson hit its stride a few days later when it defended Lavietes, 82-66, against a Colorado team that featured future first-round pick Alec Burks. Although Harvard coughed up a 12-point lead in a loss to Michigan and got run off the court by eventual national champions UConn, the Crimson picked up a win over another BCS school at the end of non-conference play with its third straight victory over Boston College, 78-69.

By the time January rolled around, it was clear that the Crimson was an improved team over last year and, without juggernaut Cornell in the picture, it was a frontrunner for the league title. Part of its success came from expected sources: the team got superb guard play out of sophomore Brandyn Curry and junior Oliver McNally, reliable wing scoring from sophomore Christian Webster, and versatility mixed with athleticism from Casey. Perhaps unexpected, though, was the immediate impact of Canadian sharpshooter Laurent Rivard, who posed a serious threat from deep, and, most importantly, the development of forward Keith Wright.

Wright changed from a big body with bad hands into a beast on the block. His ability to finish and willingness to pass made him virtually indefensible, for beefy BCS bigs and brainy Ivy defenders alike. He carried the Crimson with 12 double-doubles on the season, and he finished the year with a stat line of 14.9 points, 8.5 rebounds, and 1.8 blocks per game. Wright’s performance was good enough to earn him Ivy League Most Valuable Player (though not without controversy, as evinced by Greg Mangano’s Twitter outburst), just the second Harvard player to win that distinction.

The Crimson’s hot start to league play did little to temper the optimism surrounding the team, as Harvard breezed through its first four conference games before facing Princeton at Jadwin. The Tigers outplayed the Crimson, especially in the final 30 minutes, earning a 65-61 victory and putting an end to Harvard’s eight-game winning streak. But the Crimson had little time to wallow in the loss. The next night they played an epic double overtime game against Penn. After giving up a 15-point lead, Harvard was tied with Penn and had a chance to win at the buzzer, but an apparent foul that would have sent Curry to the line with no time left was waved off, and the game was sent into overtime. In the first extra period, the Crimson had a two-point lead in the waning moments. Penn guard Zack Rosen drove into the lane, hung in the air, and connected on a shot that video later indicated came after the buzzer. The referees didn’t have the luxury of instant replay though, and we were heading into another overtime. A McNally baseline drive gave Harvard a one-point lead in the final seconds, and this time Casey blocked Rosen’s last-ditch attempt. After the game, Wright correctly observed, “We beat that team three times.”

The rest of the season had its share of memorable games: a 3-point barnburner versus Yale, 24- and 15-point comebacks against Brown. A Princeton loss to the Bears meant the Crimson controlled its own destiny for the final two weeks, but Harvard squandered the opportunity by faltering in a 70-69 loss to the Bulldogs at John J. Lee Amphitheater. The defeat set the stage for a showdown with league-leader Princeton on the final Saturday of the regular season. The atmosphere in Lavietes was electric. After a back-and-forth first half, the Crimson began to control the game in the second frame. Casey, whose baseline drive and jam ignited the second-half run, led his team in scoring with 24 points, all the while hobbling on a broken foot that would require surgery after the season. When the final seconds ticked off the 79-67 victory, Harvard students rushed the court to celebrate at least a share of the school’s first-ever Ivy League title.

Of course, the story of the 2010-11 Harvard basketball team has a bitter ending. Princeton earned a one-game playoff after beating Penn, and the two teams squared off at JJLA for a chance to play in the NCAA Tournament. You already know what happened, so spare me the misery of reliving it. 2.8 seconds.

There was some noise about the Crimson receiving an at-large bid to the Tourney, but, to be honest, the team didn’t deserve it. They had their chance. The NIT was a nice consolation, but, given the emotional defeat just days earlier, no one expected Harvard to do much damage. Indeed, Oklahoma St. throttled the Crimson, 71-54, ending what was the greatest season in school history.

Thankfully for the Harvard faithful, the future is bright. The team returns all of its players as well as head coach Tommy Amaker, and it will benefit from another much-heralded freshman class. If it plays its cards right, come this March, Cambridge might just party like its 1946.

Season in Review: Brown Bears

Sean McGonagill dropped 39 points on 15-19 shooting against Columbia on February 4th, 2011 at the Pizzitola Center. (Photo Credit: brownbears.com)

This is the third piece in a series looking back at how each Ivy League squad fared during the 2010-11 season. The Brown Bears ended the year at 11-17 (4-10), finishing seventh in the conference.

Tucker Halpern clutched both sides of the plastic receptacle, head buried, stomach violently convulsing, while 1,532 people curiously looked on. A bad meal in Ithaca, besides being a great band name, was the culprit that had sent him fleeing off the foul line on this night, the last night of the season, at Levien Gymnasium on the campus of Columbia. Several sick teammates looked on in their sweats from the bench, as the Bears were only able to dress eight players on this night. Columbia won the game in a rout, but the mass food poisoning was merely the final straw in a season that had once held serious promise. Injuries, missed opportunities, and finally bad meat did in the Bears during the 2010-2011 campaign, though some reasons for optimism can certainly be parsed from the wreckage of an otherwise forgettable 11-17 year.

The Bears opened last season on an encouraging note by knocking off Atlantic-10 foe, Fordham, in the Bronx. In fact, after getting blown out by in-state rival, URI, Brown won their next two games to move to 3-1 for the first time since the 2000-2001 season when the Bears went on to reach the NIT. The rest of the non-conference slate was filled with inconsistent performances as the young squad tried to put it all together. A couple of times they did, including an impressive road win at Maine against a Black Bears team that ended up finishing tied for third in the America East. All in all though, there were ominous signs early in the season as the team had trouble competing on the boards and in the paint. Remember, this was a young team adjusting to life in the post-Mullery era. The only upperclassmen who logged significant playing time all season were Peter Sullivan, who put the team on his remarkably broad shoulders too many times to count, Adrian Williams, the speedy shooter off the bench, and Garrett Leffelman, the streaky sniper who never really found the mark in his senior season.

So when freshman Dockery Walker came off the bench and provided some much-needed energy against American, it was a sign that the younger generation was ready to step up. Given the chance to play serious minutes for the first time, Walker made it count, pulling down 13 rebounds and adding 10 points for his first double-double in the loss. He followed that performace up with another double-double in a rout of Lyndon St.

One month later, it was Sean McGonagill’s turn to lead the youth movement. The freshman had been running the show admirably at the point guard position all year, garnering a Rookie of the Week award early in the season, but no one could have predicted what happened on February 4th, 2011 against Columbia. Two days earlier, McGonagill’s season looked like it may be in jeopardy after a violent collision in practice resulted in broken teeth and a destroyed lip, requiring surgery the next day. He was fitted for a mask, Rip Hamilton-style, on Friday morning, and marched onto the court Friday night against Columbia.

In what had to be the individual highlight of the season for the Bears, McGonagill put on a performance for the ages, setting or tying several Pizzitola Center records with a 39-point effort on 15-19 shooting. McGonagill scored a whopping 28 of those points in the second half, re-defining the phrase “in the zone,” and eventually leading Brown to a 87-79 triumph, their first of the conference season.

A week later, it looked like the Bears had started to turn the corner. They wiped their feet on chronic doormat Dartmouth, 75-66, and waltzed into Boston like the British taking Bunker Hill, outscoring Harvard 53-31 in the first half, shocking the home crowd at Lavietes into silence behind 63 percent shooting from the field. Alas, the Crimson defended their home court admirably in the second half of this battle, holding the Bears to 13 points in the first 15 minutes of the second half and rattling off 46 of their own in that span to turn the game on its head and ride into the night with a comfortable eight point victory.

In the third conference game of the season, team captain Peter Sullivan had suffered a gruesome shoulder dislocation, which caused him to miss five games. Without Sullivan, the team missed his strength on the glass and lacked his unparalleled ability to slash to the rim and get to the free throw line. When he returned in mid-February, the Bears were on the verge of falling into the basement with Dartmouth. Instead, after a tough loss at home to Penn, Brown came out and stuck it to the league-leading Tigers, riding Sullivan’s magical night at the line (16-16) to a 75-65 win,  and dealing Princeton their first loss of the conference season. Overall, Sullivan dropped in 26 and added 8 boards for the Bears, who were starting to look like one of the best bad Ivy League teams ever.

The next weekend, the Bears played host to Harvard again. Certainly, one had to think the Crimson would have their guard up this time and play hard from the opening tip. But no, it was the Bears who again dominated the first half en route to a 41-30 lead at the break behind 15 points on 6-7 shooting from Tucker Halpern. Certainly, one had to think the Bears would be able to protect a double-digit lead after blowing one only two weeks earlier to the same team. But no, like the Empire, the Crimson struck back again, even quicker this time, regaining the lead after only eight minutes in the second half. Halpern tried to rally the troops for one more comeback, knocking down a late trey to cut the deficit to two, but his career-high 29 points were wasted in the end as Harvard held on for another comeback victory.

The Bears’ final two weeks were highlighted by Adrian Williams’ monster 26-point Senior Night performance, in which Brown dropped a century on the lowly Big Green, and the aforementioned food poisoning incident.

Surely, the Bears are anxious to turn the page on last season and put the program in the hands of a capable young team that has shown a few halves of brilliance. Now if they can just put it all together for a full 40 minutes and pack bag lunches for the Ithaca trip, they should be all right.

Season in Review: Yale Bulldogs

Yale fans rushed the court when the Bulldogs knocked off league leader and archrival, Harvard, on Senior Night last year. (Photo Credit: Yale Daily News)

This is the second piece in a series looking back at how each Ivy League squad fared during the 2010-11 season. The Yale Bulldogs ended the year at 15-13 (8-6), finishing third in the conference.

The Yale Bulldogs entered the 2010-2011 campaign with some serious question marks needing to be answered, as they lost their leading scorer Alex Zampier as well as 6’ 10” center Paul Nelson to graduation. To make matters worse, starting forward Mike Sands withdrew from school for personal reasons the day before the season, leaving serious doubt about how this team would be able to compete down low.  Some younger players were going to need to step up for this team to finish in the top half of the Ancient Eight.

Almost immediately, Yale made headlines in the non-conference season. After starting the season with a loss to Quinnipiac, the Bulldogs put up a scrappy effort in a narrow 58-55 defeat against Big East foe, Providence. In their next game, Yale continued the Ivy League’s dominance over the ACC’s Boston College thanks to a breakout performance from sophomore guard Austin Morgan, who exploded for 25 points, including six 3-pointers, to key the upset road win for Yale. In non-league play against other major conference opponents, Yale lost games to Stanford from the Pac-10 (now Pac-12) and Illinois from the Big-10.

The Bulldogs started out Ivy play with two wins over Brown, but quickly had their chances at competing for the Ivy title effectively end the next weekend, getting swept by Princeton and Penn on the road.  Both were competitive games, but they left Yale two games behind Princeton and Harvard, and since the Ancient Eight does not employ a conference tournament, the Bulldogs were all but eliminated from league title consideration. As the league quickly became a race for 3rd, the Bulldogs won three of their next four before getting swept again by Penn and Princeton, as they remained clumped with multiple teams in the league’s second tier, while Harvard and Princeton sprinted away from the pack.

The rest of Yale’s conference season was not without multiple barnburners. The Elis lost to Penn in New Haven on a Zack Rosen jump shot with just two seconds left. A week later though, in their most complete effort of the year, the Bulldogs upset Harvard on Senior Night, 70-69, erasing a six point deficit in the final six minutes to pull out an emotional one point win at John J. Lee.  In the season’s final weekend, the Bulldogs had a twelve point lead late against Columbia, but Brian Barbour caught fire, scoring thirteen points in the last four minutes to key a Lions run and send the game into overtime.  The Bulldogs pushed back though, and pulled out the 87-81 victory after two bonus periods. Amazingly, not until the final game of the year, a thirteen point loss to Cornell, did the Bulldogs play a league game decided by double digits.

Austin Morgan was one of a handful of nice surprises for the Bulldogs last year. Other major contributors included junior Reggie Willhite, who worked his way into the starting lineup and averaged nearly ten points per game after rarely seeing the floor his previous two years.  Freshman Jeremiah Kreisberg started for much of the year at center, helping replace some of the frontcourt minutes vacated by the loss of Sands and Nelson.  Kreisberg averaged 7.2 points per game and ripped down 4.5 boards per game.

However, the biggest impact came from Greg Mangano, a first-team All Ivy selection whose play last year earned him Lindy’s preseason pick for the 2011-12 Ivy Player of the Year. Mangano was a force all season on the glass, averaging 10.0 rebounds and 3.0 blocks per game. He kicked off the conference slate with a monster 23 and 17 in Providence and followed it up with a 17 point, 12 rebound, 7 block masterpiece in leading the Bulldogs to two early season victories. After declaring for the NBA draft in the offseason (and then retracting his name), Mangano was selected for the U.S. World University Games team, playing with some of college basketball’s big names, including Syracuse’s Scoop Jardine, Kentucky’s Darius Miller and current Purdue coach Matt Painter. Mangano was the only Ivy League player selected for the squad.

Mangano, Morgan, Kreisberg and Co. helped the Bulldogs finish alone in 3rd place at 8-6, having swept Brown, Columbia, and Dartmouth, split with Harvard and Cornell, and been swept by Princeton and Penn. The Bulldogs went 1-3 against co-champions Princeton and Harvard, losing the three games by a combined fourteen points and stunning Harvard on Senior Night in New Haven, dealing their archrivals their second loss and forcing them to have to beat Princeton twice to make the NCAA tournament.

2010-11 Season in Review: Princeton Tigers

Doug Davis nails a last-second shot to win the Ivy League playoff for the Princeton Tigers.

 

This is the first in a series looking back at how each Ivy League squad fared during the 2010-11 season. The Princeton Tigers finished the year at 25-7 (12-2), winning a share of the Ivy League title and the NCAA bid that was awarded to the winner of the Ivy League playoff.

The Princeton Tigers’ 2010-2011 season was defined by a single shot. You all know the story by now – Doug Davis, 2.8 seconds on the clock, Princeton down by 1 against Harvard in the Ivy League playoff game to decide who gets to go to the NCAA tournament. Davis cuts left, catches the inbound pass, drives right, pump fakes, ducks under the flailing Harvard defender, elevates, and swishes the jumper. The crowd goes wild, the Tigers go to the tournament, and Davis becomes a minor celebrity (buoyed, at least somewhat, by the whole “Teach Me How To Dougie” craze, which was still a big deal back then).

We’ll get to the shot, I promise. But first we need to figure out how Princeton got there in the first place. Because while his buzzer beater made him the hero, Davis never would have had the chance if it weren’t for a pair of seniors – guard Dan Mavraides and forward Kareem Maddox – a sophomore gunslinger – forward Ian Hummer – and head coach Sydney Johnson (recently departed for the apparently greener pastures of Fairfield University). They were the ones who brought the Tigers out charging to start the season, willed them to the Ivy League playoff, and got the ball into Davis’s hands.

Princeton made something of a statement in its first game of the season, an overtime win against cross-town rival Rutgers. Over the past decade or so, the Scarlet Knights had grown accustomed to shellacking the Tigers to kick off the year, but Mavraides was having none of it this time around. The senior came out firing, shooting 6-10 from beyond the arch to lead all scorers with 26 points.

But the Tigers fell quickly back to atoledo earth, getting humbled at the CBE Classic. The team got blown out by Duke, then the number one team in the country, finishing 1-3 for the tournament. But something important happened during the third game of the tournament, the lone win over Bucknell – a decision that perhaps defined Princeton’s entire season.

Kareem Maddox was coming off a solid, if unspectacular, junior season as a reserve forward. He started the first three games of the year and put up middling numbers, playing decent but uninspiring basketball. But against Bucknell, Johnson sat Maddox for the first few minutes of the game, then brought him in as an early sub. Maddox played most of the remaining game, staying on the court far longer than the true “starter,” sophomore center Brendan Connolly. Maddox wouldn’t start another game for the rest of the year until senior night, his final home game at the end nederlandsegokken online casino of the season.

But something about the unorthodox strategy worked for Maddox. In his first game after the CBE tournament, Maddox came off the bench and absolutely dominated, going off for 30 points, 10 boards, and three blocks in an overtime win against Siena at home. A few games later, Maddox, still coming off the bench, scored 31 points in a double overtime win against Tulsa. The Tigers won eight straight before losing to then-19th ranked Central Florida.

After the loss to UCF, Princeton reeled off 10 straight wins and went 7-0 to start Ivy League play, beating every other team in the league. Sophomore forward

Ian Hummer emerged as one of the top scoring threats for the Tigers; the underclassman scored 25 and grabbed 12 rebounds against Columbia. Maddox continued to play out of his mind and established himself as the premier defensive big man in the league, with five blocks in Princeton’s overtime win against Penn.

The Tigers started to play sloppy basketball at the end of the season, losing to Brown by 10 points before getting blown out by Harvard in Cambridge. Princeton dug itself into a hole during the last game of the season, having to come back from down eight in the second half against Penn to tie with Harvard for the Ivy League championship and force a playoff game to decide who got to go dancin’.

Harvard hadn’t been to the NCAA tournament since 1946. And Princeton was only one game removed from the smack down administered by Harvard in their final regular season matchup. Each team had won at home that season, and the game was played at Yale, the neutral site between the two schools. Princeton kept it close enough for one last shot. And Doug Davis took care of the rest.

The NCAA tournament was a victory lap for the Tigers. They had already won; the rest was just gravy. Of course, no one remembered to tell that to the players, who did their best to imitate Sydney Johnson’s epic upset over UCLA in 1996.  It took a last second runner by Brandon Knight (held scoreless to that point!) to put Final Four-bound Kentucky over Princeton in the first round. But Princeton fans didn’t care. They had their season. They had their shot. And they didn’t need anything else.

Maddox, who only started four games all year, was a unanimous First Team All-Ivy selection and was voted Defensive Player of the Year, finishing his season with 52 blocks. Mavraides and Hummer were both voted Second Team All-Ivy.

And Doug Davis, who had been voted Honorable Mention his freshman year and Second Team his sophomore season, didn’t garner any league honors. Instead, he became immortal, a legend permanently ensconced in Princeton basketball lore. The shot of Davis sitting on the floor of the Yale gym, arms raised and two fingers held up on each hand because he knows the ball is going in, is the definitive image of the season. The record books may call Princeton Co-Champions, but last season, Princeton won.