BYU downs Princeton at Jadwin Gym, 65-56, following Henderson’s ejection

PRINCETON – The Tigers played a wild and weird game last night, opening its home schedule against BYU of the West Coast Conference. Having defeated Gonzaga in Spokane three times in three years, the Cougars were not likely to be intimidated by the hangar-like atmosphere of Jadwin Gym. They weren’t.

With 7:38 to go in the second half, the Cougars’ Zac Seljaas, perhaps the best outside shooter in BYU history, canned a long three to give his team a 48-43 lead, prompting Mitch Henderson to call a 30-second timeout.

Bad move.

The Tigers coach, for some reason not apparent to onlookers, went full Vesuvius on the officials. He was clearly bothered by his team’s treatment by the referees, a state of affairs he determined to be particularly galling at home. The nearest official found Henderson’s breach of decorum to be itself galling and worthy of two technical fouls, sending Henderson to the locker room and the Cougars’ best free-throw shooter, Elijah Bryant,  to the line for four shots. Of course, he made all four, breaking open what had been a close, if somewhat sloppily played, contest.

Read moreBYU downs Princeton at Jadwin Gym, 65-56, following Henderson’s ejection

BYU holds off Princeton, 82-73

Mitch Henderson wanted to challenge his senior-laden squad with a tough early schedule. The opener against the BYU Cougars in Provo was a little too tough. BYU prevailed 82-73, although the gritty visitors managed to get within one with seven minutes left.

Three crucial stats tell you all you need to know about this one:

Read moreBYU holds off Princeton, 82-73

Toothless Tiger’s interview with ESPN 960 Sports

Ivy Hoops Online writer George Clark (Toothless Tiger) spoke with ESPN 960 Sports in Utah to give an in-depth preview Princeton’s tilt with BYU in Provo Monday night. Listen here for a primer on what to expect from BYU and the Marriott Center as well as George’s preview of the game from Princeton’s perspective.

 

Harvard shines in Hawaii: How the Crimson did it and what it means

Lately, Harvard has been a completely  different team than it was back in November. After a close loss at Kansas and a nice win at Boston University, the Crimson traveled to Hawaii to partake in the 2015 Diamond Head Classic. The Crimson drew BYU in the first round. The tournament was a huge test for Harvard: would the Crimson revert back to its November self? Or would Harvard build on its two previous good performances and play well?

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Exam Break Outlook: Harvard’s stock rising

With the Ivy season under a month away, the Crimson’s performance has been all over the map. At times, they show signs that this is just a rebuilding year, while at other times, they show great promise for current-year success. Regardless, coming off three consecutive well-played games, Harvard is indisputably a team that has improved significantly since the start of the season.

In my last article, I stated that Harvard’s success would be largely dependent on the success and maturation of freshman point guard Tommy McCarthy. Here’s some evidence that McCarthy has been key in Harvard’s recent streak of good games. In McCarthy’s first three Division I games, all games in which Harvard underachieved, McCarthy shot an abysmal 18 percent from the floor (6-for-34) and had 14 turnovers and only eight assists (.57 assist/turnover ratio). In his last three games, which have included a win over Boston University, a close loss at Northeastern, and a six-point loss at No. 4 Kansas, McCarthy has shot 40 percent from the floor (including 42 percent from beyond the arc) and posted 19 assists to eight turnovers (2.4 assist/turnover ratio).

Read moreExam Break Outlook: Harvard’s stock rising